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Anglicanism and revolution feature in winter issue of Anglican and Episcopal History

8 Jan 2021 3:08 PM | HSEC Director of Operations (Administrator)

Anglican and Episcopal History 2020The winter issue of Anglican and Episcopal History (AEH) is now in print. The latest issue of the peer-reviewed journal of the Historical Society of the Episcopal Church features studies and book reviews that examine the relationship between monarchy, revolution, Puritanism, and the Church of England.

Two detailed studies consider the role of Anglicanism in England’s seventeenth century revolutions.

First, John William Klein considers a rural case study of patronage during the Nonjuring Schism, a division in the Church of England created when some clerics refused to swear allegiance to monarchs William and Mary after the Glorious Revolution of 1688. In “Francis Cherry, Patronage, and the Shottesbrooke Nonjurors”, Klein offers a rural case study of patronage based on the relationship between Anglo-Irish scholar and theologian Henry Dodwell the Elder (1641-1711) and country squire Francis Cherry (1665-1713). Klein concludes that the countryside estate of Shottesbrooke Park in Berkshire, England, was “a model of rural patronage and community for Nonjurors” and argues that “patronage was essential to survival of the Nonjurors.” The small Nonjuring movement fizzled by the mid-1700s.

Kent M. Pettit then invites readers to consider ways King Charles II used the Great Fire of London in 1666 to strengthen the shaky monarchy. Pettit considers the debate between preservation and innovation in regards to the destruction of the medieval Old St. Paul’s Cathedral. He also invites parallels to present-day political and religious discussions in Paris regarding Notre Dame Cathedral. In “Saved as by Fire (and poets): Charles II, Restored Head of the Church”, Pettit argues that Charles II’s leadership and timely maneuvering increased the monarch’s power as the king offered a Christian vision of “grace and hope” in contrast to pessimistic Puritans’ emphasis on “guilt or sin”.

AEH also includes multiple book reviews related to revolution and the Church of England, Anglican studies, women’s studies, and more.

In the first book review related to revolution, Norman Jones of Utah State University considers The Puritans: A Transatlantic History by David D. Hall. Then, C. Scott Pryor of Campbell University School of Law reviews Diarmaid MacCulloch’s Thomas Cromwell: A Life; and Tanner J. Moore of Purdue University considers the expanded edition of Not Peace but a Sword: The Political Theology of the English Reformation by Stephen Baskerville.

Several helpful volumes related to Anglican studies are also included. Among them are: Reasonable Radical? Reading the Writings of Martyn Percy edited by Ian S. Markham and Joshua Daniel; Costly Communion: Ecumenical Initiative and Sacramental Strife in the Anglican Communion edited by Mary Chapman and Jeremy Bonner; The Future of Orthodox Anglicanism edited by Gerald McDermott; and Common Prayer: Reflections on Episcopal Worship by Joseph Pagano and Amy E. Richter.

Book reviews related to women’s studies include Joan R. Gundersen on Ordinary Saints: Women, Work, and Faith in Newfoundland by Bonnie Morgan and Sheryl A. Kujawa-Holbrook reviewing English Aristocratic Women and the Fabric of Piety, 1450-1550 by Barbara J. Harris and Feminist Interpretations of Mary Astell edited by Alice Sowaal and Penny A. Weiss.

In addition to these studies and book reviews, church review editor J. Barrington Bates takes readers to a worship service at St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Springfield Center, New York, part of the Diocese of Albany.

These articles and other book reviews in the winter issue are available to members of the Historical Society of the Episcopal Church and later available via JSTOR.org and other online services.

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