Seal of the Historical Society of the Episcopal ChurchHistorical Society of the
Episcopal Church

News

  • 12 Jul 2019 8:45 AM | HSEC Director of Operations (Administrator)

    Susan Ann Johnson, former HSEC Director of Operations, died July 4, 2019. She was 73. She was very active in the Episcopal Women’s History Project and was the former Archivist for the Diocese of Southwest Texas. She was the facilitator of the 2013 Tri-History Conference in San Antonio. The following article was published in the recent Timelines newsletter of the Episcopal Women's History Project.

    Susan Ann Johnson majored in English, History and Philosophy when she graduated from college in the late 90’s. Going to college before that was just a dream for her, but in her studies, she studied the things she wanted to master, and she did it.

    When Susan first attended school, her father, who was in the service, was stationed in France, and Susan’s native language for the first years of life was French. Her family returned to Texas and Susan was middle school age. She didn’t know English, she was in fluent French, and the school system couldn’t know what to do with Susan.

    She eventually landed in the 5th grade, and from there she began being an American kid.

    For Susan, the Episcopal Church offered everything she loved—the services were in English, the Episcopal Church was full of history, and the theology fed her love for Philosophy. Susan was born in Del Rio, Texas, but most of her adult life she lived in Harlingen, Texas. As a member of St. Alban's Episcopal Church, a parish that has been active in that community for more than 100 years, Susan was a member of the Episcopal Church Women in her parish. She attended her first Women’s Gathering at Camp Capers. That experience helped her find a calling in service through the work of the women, and soon she became active in the ECW of the Diocese of West Texas.

    Susan desired to grow spiritually and to give more through that growth. She made a retreat to the Order of Julian of Norwich in Wisconsin. She embraced the love and the goals of St. Julian and ultimately became an Oblate in that order. She then joined the Order of The Daughters’ of the King and was active in the service of the DOK in her parish.

    There were many ways to serve the Church as a woman, and Susan embraced it all. She served on the ECW Diocesan Board, then she became the Province Representative on the National ECW Board. She became an officer on that board. Then she learned about The Episcopal Women’s History Project. She became an active member of that organization and then joined the Board of that organization, where she was serving at the time of her death.

    The work of the EWHP brought together to her three loves, English, History and Philosophy. She helped organize the Seneca Falls Conference in 2011 called “Making It Do, Gettng It Done.” The Seneca Falls settng was where the Suffragettes began their work.

    The highlight of that event was a panel led by The Rev. Barbara Schlachter, with members of the team who were part of the famous Philadelphia Eleven.

    At Seneca Falls, Susan learned of the story of Artemisia Bowden, a Black Woman from North Carolina who was recruited to Texas by Bishop Steptoe Johnson to teach Black Women at St. Phillip’s College in San Antonio in 1902. Susan decided that Artemisia Bowden belonged in the Book of Contemporary Saints.

    She took on that mission. She engaged many others and began the process of acknowledging the work of Artemisia Bowden to the church. Because of the work of Susan Johnson, Bowden became a Saint at the 2015 General Convention of the Episcopal Church.

    The story of Artemisia is now celebrated as a new Saint in The Great Cloud of Witnesses, the Episcopal Book acknowledging the newer Saints in the Kingdom.

    Susan Ann Johnson has been a bright light in the work of the women of the Episcopal Church. She will be greatly missed by all.

    Susan Ann Johnson
    Servant, Well Done!
    RIP

    This Link will take you to Susan Johnson talking about the Artemisia Bowden project.

  • 7 Jul 2019 9:00 PM | HSEC Director of Operations (Administrator)

    Stephen LongeneckerThe Historical Society of the Episcopal Church is pleased to announce its recipient of the 2019 Nelson R. Burr Prize, Dr. Stephen L. Longenecker. Stephen is Edwin L. Turner Distinguished Professor of History at Bridgewater College, Bridgewater, VA. He earned a B.S. from Shippensburg University; M.A. from West Virginia University and Ph.D. from The Johns Hopkins University. Teaching Fields include American History, American Religious History, History of the South, and the American Civil War.

    Dr. Longenecker is honored for his article entitled “Randolph H. McKim: Lost Cause Conservative, Episcopal Liberal,” published in the September 2018 issue (Volume 87, No. 3) of Anglican and Episcopal History. Working on a teaching campus, Longenecker noted that he mostly writes for fun.

    This article is part of a larger study that compares the faith and politics of former Confederate chaplains after the Civil War. “Randolph McKim is one of those persons who makes history come alive,” Longenecker noted, “and I had easy material to work with.” His most recent book is “Gettysburg Religion: Refinement, Diversity, and Race in the Antebellum and Civil War Border North.”

    The Burr prize honors the renowned scholar Nelson R. Burr, whose two-volume A Critical Bibliography of Religion in America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1961) and other works constitute landmarks in the field of religious historiography. Each year a committee of the Society selects the author of the most outstanding article in the Society's journal, Anglican and Episcopal History, as recipient. The award also honors that which best exemplifies excellence and innovative scholarship in the field of Anglican and Episcopal history.

    Download and read Randolph H. McKim: Lost Cause Conservative, Episcopal Liberal.

  • 12 Feb 2019 9:46 AM | HSEC Director of Operations (Administrator)

    The Chair of the Grants and Research Committee of the Historical Society of the Episcopal Church, the Rev. Dr. Robert Tobin, is pleased to announce the inaugural Robert W. Prichard Prize to be awarded in 2019. The prize is made to help meet one of the Society’s objectives: promotion of the preservation of the particular heritage of the Episcopal Church and its antecedents. To be considered, applications must be submitted no later than May 1st. The prize will be announced July and the recipient is expected to make an appropriate submission to the Society’s journal, Anglican and Episcopal History.

    The Prichard Prize purpose is to recognize the best Ph.D., Th.D., or D.Phil. dissertation which has considered the history of the Episcopal Church (including 17th and 18th century British colonies that became the United States) as well as the Anglican church in the worldwide Anglican Communion. The prize is named to honor the Rev. Dr. Robert W. Prichard, a longtime board member and president of the Society and a noted historian and author in the discipline.

    Applicants are invited to submit a dissertation for consideration which was successfully defended between January 1, 2016 and December 31, 2018. It may be submitted by the author or on the author’s behalf. The dissertation need not focus solely or even principally on the history of the Episcopal Church or Anglicanism. The selection committee welcomes dissertations which place that history in conjunction with other strands of church history, or even place it in dialogue with non-ecclesial themes of American history. The Episcopal or Anglican element of the work should be a constitutive, not peripheral, part of the dissertation. Submissions should be a full electronic version of the dissertation, complete with all scholarly apparatus. The recipient of the prize will be announced in July and receive $2000.

    For details including application instruction and information, visit hsec.us/grants.

    Bob Prichard received recognition in 2016 for his many years of service to the Historical Society.

  • 12 Feb 2019 9:00 AM | HSEC Director of Operations (Administrator)

    The Chair of the Grants and Research Committee of the Historical Society of the Episcopal Church, the Rev. Dr. Robert Tobin, invites applications for Grants to be awarded in 2019. Grants are made to help meet one of the Society’s objectives: promotion of the preservation of the particular heritage of the Episcopal Church and its antecedents. To be considered, applications must be submitted no later than May 1st. The awards will be announced July. Award recipients are expected to make an appropriate submission to the Society’s journal, Anglican and Episcopal History.

    Applications for a general grant may come from individuals as well as academic and ecclesiastical groups. Requests are received that will support significant research, conferences, and publication relating to the history of the Episcopal Church as well as the Anglican church in the worldwide Anglican Communion. A typical request may include funding for travel to visit archives or other resources, dissertation research, or seed money or support for a larger project. Examples of past awards funded include support of documentary films, dissertation research, publication of books and articles, support for a history conference and other purposes. Awards funded are usually generally $500-$2,000, depending on the number of awards approved and amount of funds available.

    For details including application instruction and information, visit hsec.us/grants.

  • 16 Jun 2018 8:00 PM | HSEC Director of Operations (Administrator)

    The Historical Society of the Episcopal Church is pleased to announce its recipient of the 2018 Nelson R. Burr Prize, Dr. Emilie Amt. Emilie is Hildegarde Pilgram Professor of History at Hood College, Frederick, Maryland. She earned a B.A. from Swarthmore College and a D.Phil from Oxford University.

    She is honored for her article entitled “Down from the Balcony: African Americans and Episcopal Congregations in Washington County, Maryland, 1800-1864” published in the March 2017 issue of Anglican and Episcopal History.

    While her professional focus specializes in the experience of religious women and in 12th- and 13th-century English government, finance and war, for the last eight years she has been researching slavery in western Maryland. This work grew out of a desire at her church, St. Mark Episcopal Church-Lappans in Boonsboro, Maryland, to know more about the enslaved people who attended when it was built in 1849. Her work has also contributed to the Truth & Reconciliation project and Trail of Souls Pilgrimage in the Diocese of Maryland. Her most recent book is The Latin Cartulary of Godstow Abbey, published by Oxford University Press for the British Academy in 2014.

    The Burr prize honors the renowned scholar Nelson R. Burr, whose two-volume A Critical Bibliography of Religion in America (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1961) and other works constitute landmarks in the field of religious historiography. Each year a committee of the Society selects the author of the most outstanding article in the Society's journal, Anglican and Episcopal History, as recipient. The award also honors that which best exemplifies excellence and innovative scholarship in the field of Anglican and Episcopal history.

    Those interested in obtaining a copy of the article may contact Matthew. P. Payne, Director of Operations of the Society at administration@hsec.us or (920) 383-1910.

  • 27 Jan 2018 12:00 PM | HSEC Director of Operations (Administrator)

    Anglican and Episcopal History will launch a digital edition in 2018. This quarterly journal of the Historical Society of the Episcopal Church has been published since 1932. AEH seeks to raise the level of discussion, provide a forum for exchange of ideas, and review books of real worth and of interest to educated Anglicans. Originally published as The Historical Magazine of the Episcopal Church (1932-1986), AEH is composed under the direction of and Editor-in-Chief with Book Review Editor and Church Review Editor providing content in each issue.

    The digital edition of AEH will be produced and managed by Sheridan Digital Editions using both the conventional way to convert print publication PDFs into digital counterparts and going a step further with feature-rich HTML5 viewing for desktop or mobile device. Sheridan’s Digital Editions are mobile device compatible with full navigation. Sheridan also produces the print edition of AEH and many of the world’s most prestigious and highly cited STM and Scholarly journals. They have been a part of the movement with an array of solutions for the content continuum, from print to online.

    Initially, the digital edition will be an add-on benefit for Society members who continue receiving the print edition. Members will be given the opportunity to stop the print edition during this transition period. The Society's membership model will change in 2019. Members will pay dues and may select a delivery option of print OR digital, print AND digital, or not receiving AEH in any form. The option of non-member digital and/or print delivery will also become available.

    Those currently subscribed to AEH through a subscription service will continue receiving the print edition with the digital option becoming available at the next renewal cycle.

    The Board of Directors of the Historical Society of the Episcopal Church have considered these options for the past few years. With service available through Sheridan, no additional time or effort is necessary from the editors in producing an issue. Many members have been requesting digital delivery as more and more people shift to non-print sources. Our goal is to provide the content in the way it will be most effective for our members and subscribers.

    Any questions about the change may be directed to the Director of Operations, Matthew P. Payne at administration@hsec.com.

  • 12 Jan 2018 12:00 PM | HSEC Director of Operations (Administrator)

    The Rev. Dr. Sheryl Kujawa-Holbrook, Book Review Editor of Anglican and Episcopal History, seeks individuals willing to write book reviews for the journal. Book Reviewers are volunteers who contribute their time and expertise for the encouragement of research, writing and education on all levels that keeps alive the Church's heritage. Assignments are determined by the Book Review Editor. If you have interest in serving as a reviewer, please complete the form at hsec.us/bookreviews.

Historical Society of the Episcopal Church

Dedicated to preserving and disseminating information about the history of the Episcopal Church and its antecedents.
A 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization established for educational, charitable and religious purposes.

(920) 383-1910 | administration@hsec.us | PO Box 1301, Appleton, WI 54912-1301 | © 2019

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software